Early Warning Dispute Address: How to Protect Your Financial Reputation

A consumer get an alert on their phone and needs the Early Warning dispute address.

Early Warning Dispute Address: How to Protect Your Financial Reputation

As a consumer, you rely on credit reporting agencies to maintain accurate information about your financial history. However, with the immense amount of sensitive information they possess, it’s essential to be aware of their practices and take action to protect your financial reputation. Early Warning Services (EWS) is one such credit reporting agency that gathers and shares information about consumers’ banking history, including monthly balances, transactions, account opening and closing dates, and more. If you’re concerned about your information being shared with EWS, here’s what you need to know about the Early Warning dispute address and how to protect yourself against any potential violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

What is Early Warning Services and Why Should You Be Concerned?

Early Warning Services is a credit reporting agency that provides information to over 2,500 companies, including some of the biggest banks in the industry. They have access to your banking history, including your savings and checking account details, balances, account history, and banking activity. While they claim to provide innovation that transforms financial experiences and lives, their track record tells a different story.

In their 15 years of service, EWS has faced 445 lawsuits, 65 of which were for FCRA violations. Over a million complaints have been filed with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), and they have a measly 1.04-star review from the Better Business Bureau. This should be concerning to any consumer who values their financial reputation.

Early Warning Dispute Address

If you find inaccuracies in your EWS report, you have the right to dispute them under the FCRA. To do so, you’ll need to send a dispute letter to EWS at the following address:

Early Warning Services, LLC
Attn: Consumer Services
16552 N 90th St
Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Your dispute letter should include:

– Your name and contact information, with a copy of your ID and a current utility bill

– A clear identification of the inaccurate information in your report

– An explanation of why the information is inaccurate

– Any supporting documentation you have to back up your dispute

– A request for EWS to correct or delete the inaccurate information

It’s important to send your dispute letter via certified mail with a return receipt requested so that you have proof of delivery. Once EWS receives your dispute, they have 30 days to investigate and respond to your request. If they find that the information is inaccurate, they must correct or delete it.

You can also call Early Warning at 800-745-1560 and make a dispute by phone.

Protecting Yourself Against FCRA Violations

If EWS fails to correct or delete inaccurate information in your report, they may be violating the FCRA. The FCRA requires credit reporting agencies to follow certain procedures to ensure accurate information. If you believe that EWS has violated the FCRA, you have the right to take legal action against them.

Seeking legal help from a consumer protection attorney who has experience in handling FCRA cases can help you navigate the complexities of the legal system. They can advise you on your rights and help you build a case against EWS if they’ve violated the FCRA. Remember that under the FCRA, if you’re successful in a lawsuit against Early Warning Services, they must pay your attorney’s fees. So, there’s no charge, and no attorney should charge you anything for taking on a case against EWS under the FCRA. Call us or schedule a free consult today.

 

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About The Author

Bill Clanton

Over the years my office has helped thousands of consumers who were cheated, ripped-off, and mistreated by debt collectors, credit reporting agencies, banks, credit unions, and car dealers. If you have a problem with a business being dishonest with you give me a call. I’d love to set them straight.